Monthly Archives: January 2010

Obama: GOP Focused On Winning Elections, Not Solving Problems-CC

At this time last year, amidst headlines about banks on the verge of collapse and job losses of 700,000 a month, we received another troubling piece of news about our economy.  Our economy was shrinking at an alarming rate – the largest six-month decline in 50 years.  Our factories and farms were producing less; our businesses were selling less; and more job losses were on the horizon.  
One year later, according to numbers released this past week, this trend has reversed itself.  For the past six months, our economy has been growing again.  And last quarter, it grew more quickly than at any time in the past six years.  
This is a sign of progress.  And it’s an affirmation of the difficult decisions we made last year to pull our financial system back from the brink and get our economy moving again.  
But when so many people are still struggling – when one in ten Americans still can’t find work, and millions more are working harder and longer for less – our mission isn’t just to grow the economy.  It’s to grow jobs for folks who want them, and ensure wages are rising for those who have them.  It’s not just about improvements we see in quarterly statistics, but ones people feel in their daily lives – a bigger paycheck; more security; the ability to give your kids a decent shot in life and still have enough to retire one day yourself.  
That’s why job creation will be our number one focus in 2010.  We’ll put more Americans back to work rebuilding our infrastructure all across the country.  And since the true engines of job creation are America’s businesses, I’ve proposed tax credits to help them hire new workers, raise wages, and invest in new plants and equipment.  I also want to eliminate all capital gains taxes on small business investment, and help small businesses get the loans they need to open their doors and expand their operations.   
 
But as we work to create jobs, it is critical that we rein in the budget deficits we’ve been accumulating for far too long – deficits that won’t just burden our children and grandchildren, but could damage our markets, drive up our interest rates, and jeopardize our recovery right now. Continue Reading →

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Obama Faces GOP On Its Talking Points -CC

President Obama speaks to the GOP House Issues forum and debunks many talking points offered as questions by Republican House members.  
Transcript:

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you.  Thank you very much.  Thank you.  Please, everybody be seated.  Thank you.  Thank you, John, for the gracious introduction.  To Mike and Eric, thank you for hosting me.  Thank you to all of you for receiving me.  It is  wonderful to be here.  I want to also acknowledge Mark Strand, president of the Congressional Institute.  To all the family members who are here and who have to put up with us for an elective office each and every day, thank you, because I know that’s tough.  (Applause.)
 
I very much am appreciative of not only the tone of your introduction, John, but also the invitation that you extended to me.  You know what they say, “Keep your friends close, but visit the Republican Caucus every few months.”  (Laughter.)
 
Part of the reason I accepted your invitation to come here was because I wanted to speak with all of you, and not just to all of you.  So I’m looking forward to taking your questions and having a real conversation in a few moments.  And I hope that the conversation we begin here doesn’t end here; that we can continue our dialogue in the days ahead.  It’s important to me that we do so.  It’s important to you, I think, that we do so.  But most importantly, it’s important to the American people that we do so.  
I’ve said this before, but I’m a big believer not just in the value of a loyal opposition, but in its necessity.  Having differences of opinion, having a real debate about matters of domestic policy and national security — and that’s not something that’s only good for our country, it’s absolutely essential.  It’s only through the process of disagreement and debate that bad ideas get tossed out and good ideas get refined and made better.  And that kind of vigorous back and forth — that imperfect but well-founded process, messy as it often is — is at the heart of our democracy.  That’s what makes us the greatest nation in the world.  
So, yes, I want you to challenge my ideas, and I guarantee you that after reading this I may challenge a few of yours.  (Laughter.)  I want you to stand up for your beliefs, and knowing this caucus, I have no doubt that you will.  I want us to have a constructive debate.  The only thing I don’t want — and here I am listening to the American people, and I think they don’t want either — is for Washington to continue being so Washington-like.  I know folks, when we’re in town there, spend a lot of time reading the polls and looking at focus groups and interpreting which party has the upper hand in November and in 2012 and so on and so on and so on.  That’s their obsession.  
And I’m not a pundit.  I’m just a President, so take it for what it’s worth.  But I don’t believe that the American people want us to focus on our job security.  They want us to focus on their job security.  (Applause.)  I don’t think they want more gridlock.  I don’t think they want more partisanship.  I don’t think they want more obstruction.  They didn’t send us to Washington to fight each other in some sort of political steel-cage match to see who comes out alive.  That’s not what they want.  They sent us to Washington to work together, to get things done, and to solve the problems that they’re grappling with every single day. Continue Reading →

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Obama’s State Of The Union- Full Speech

THE PRESIDENT: Madam Speaker, Vice President Biden, members of Congress, distinguished guests, and fellow Americans: Our Constitution declares that from time to time, the President shall give to Congress information about the state of our union. For 220 years, our leaders have fulfilled this duty. They’ve done so during periods of prosperity and tranquility. And they’ve done so in the midst of war and depression; at moments of great strife and great struggle. It’s tempting to look back on these moments and assume that our progress was inevitable — that America was always destined to succeed. Continue Reading →

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Stopping Home Foreclosures – MN Gov Debate

Tom Emmer (GOP), Margaret Anderson Kelliher (DFL), Rob Hahn (IP) and R.T. Rybak (DFL) discuss their plans to stop the increasing number of home foreclosures in the state at a MN governor candidates’ forum in Bloomington, MN on January 27, 2010. Continue Reading →

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Ed Schultz “I’d Kick Their Ass” If I Ran For US Senate (CC)

Talk show host Ed Schultz talks about not running for US Senate, brining his TV show to Minnesota for the Bachmann/Palin rally and telling White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs that he is “full of shit”. Transcript highlights:
I want all of you to know that I’m not running for the United States Senate. But I also want you to know that if I did,I’d kick their ass. Because that’s what it’s about.  
I understand that  Michele Bachmann has got Sarah Palin coming in on April seventh. So if all of you here if all of you here will make a commitment to me tonight that if I bring my TV show right across the street from where they’re doing their rally you’ll all show up. Is that a deal?Okay we’ll do it.  

I know this this of those being recorded but I wasn’t told it was off the record but Mister Gibbs I had quite a conversation off the air the other night and I’m going to tell you I told him he was full of shit, is what I told him. I mean I did. and then he gave me that Dick Cheney F bomb the same way Senator Leahy got it on the senate floor. So I told Robert Gibbs, I said and I’m sorry you’re swearing at me but, you know I’m just trying to help you out. I’m telling you you’re losing your base. Do you understand that you’re losing your base? Continue Reading →

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Obama: I will continue to fight.

President Obama spoke at a town hall in Lorain County, Ohio, stressing the idea that while the economy may be rocky and the fight difficult, he will keep on fighting for health care and jobs as long as he’s President. He said he’s not pursuing this fight for poll reasons; in fact, he said, if he wanted his poll numbers to go up, he would “do nothing.” January 22, 2009. Continue Reading →

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Mark Dayton Formally Announces His Campaign For Governor

Today Mark Dayton formally announced what we’ve known for some time–he’s running for Governor. Introduced by people he’d helped and union leaders, he then spoke briefly. Afterwards he drove away from the Capital to visit 87 Minnesota Counties in 87 days, starting with Duluth later today. Continue Reading →

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Obama Cracks Down On Tax Cheats

President Obama outlined his proposal today for cracking down on tax cheats and signed an executive order aimed at blocking contractors who are delinquent on their taxes from receiving new government contracts. He will also directed the IRS to conduct a review of the overall accuracy of companies’ claims about tax delinquency to be sure that when a company says it’s paying taxes, it is telling the truth. Continue Reading →

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Citizen Journalist opportunites for Spring 2010

Contact info: jennifer.whigham@theuptake.org
 
Happy 2010 to you!  On February 4th, the Minnesota legislature kicks back into gear.  Like last year, we’ll be streaming live each day’s House and Senate sessions on our front page. We’d like you to get involved!  There are three levels you can choose from, depending on your technical skill.Basic needs for all levels:-Access to a computer and an internet connection-An interest in politics.  (You don’t need to be an expert in the Minnesota legislature or politics; if you have an interest in your government and community, you’ll quickly catch on to the issues and characters in the legislature.) -Daytime hours.You don’t need to be in Minnesota or a Minnesotan resident to do this – just need a passion for government.First level:  The easiest and requires nothing except daytime hours, an internet connection, and an interest in politics.  Watch the legislative sessions on our front page anywhere you have an internet connection.  Take notes to pass along via e-mail to Mike and Jennifer at the end of your shifts.Second level: Watch the legislative session, take notes and also live-twitter the interesting bits on our Twitter account. This requires excellent writing skills and an understanding of Twitter and social media. Third level: Watch the legislative session, take notes, live-twitter the interesting bits and also stop/start/monitor the actual recording of the sessions.  We use a web-based software called Livestream, which is user-friendly and intuitive.  You wouldn’t be dealing with cameras or equipment – just pushing some buttons.  (Literally.)The part where I wax nostalgically: Mike & I handled all of the legislative monitoring last year, and while I initially thought it would be dull and uninspiring, I found myself fascinated each day.  You get to know your legislators like  TV characters, and get caught up in their plot-lines and dramas. 
 
But it’s also empowering to be so close to the action – you’re watching your government discuss your laws and your life in real-time.  You’ll be informing our audience and those around you of issues & events they don’t have the time to follow.  True – parts can be dull, but (and I might be a nerd) I was riveted and inspired most days.Off my soapbox.  Drop me a line at jennifer.whigham@theuptake.org if you’d like to be involved.  The session starts February 4th and runs through May or June.  Hours vary at the legislature, but they’ll mostly run normal business hours. Shifts can be as little as one hour at time, or the entire day, depending on your availability and desire.  I’ll add your name to the list, and then send out a sign-up sheet in the next few weeks.  Thanks for watching! Continue Reading →

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Obama At The Pulpit: Learning From Martin Luther King’s Generation (CC)

Transcript:
Good morning.  Praise be to God.  Let me begin by thanking the entire Vermont Avenue Baptist Church family for welcoming our family here today.  It feels like a family.  Thank you for making us feel that way.  (Applause.)  To Pastor Wheeler, first lady Wheeler, thank you so much for welcoming us here today.  Congratulations on Jordan Denice — aka Cornelia.  (Laughter.)
 
Michelle and I have been blessed with a new nephew this year as well — Austin Lucas Robinson.  (Applause.)  So maybe at the appropriate time we can make introductions.  (Laughter.)  Now, if Jordan’s father is like me, then that will be in about 30 years. (Laughter.)  That is a great blessing.  
Michelle and Malia and Sasha and I are thrilled to be here today.  And I know that sometimes you have to go through a little fuss to have me as a guest speaker.  (Laughter.)  So let me apologize in advance for all the fuss.  
We gather here, on a Sabbath, during a time of profound difficulty for our nation and for our world.  In such a time, it soothes the soul to seek out the Divine in a spirit of prayer; to seek solace among a community of believers.  But we are not here just to ask the Lord for His blessing.  We aren’t here just to interpret His Scripture.  We’re also here to call on the memory of one of His noble servants, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
 
Now, it’s fitting that we do so here, within the four walls of Vermont Avenue Baptist Church — here, in a church that rose like the phoenix from the ashes of the civil war; here in a church formed by freed slaves, whose founding pastor had worn the union blue; here in a church from whose pews congregants set out for marches and from whom choir anthems of freedom were heard; from whose sanctuary King himself would sermonize from time to time.  
One of those times was Thursday, December 6, 1956.  Pastor, you said you were a little older than me, so were you around at that point?  (Laughter.)  You were three years old — okay.  (Laughter.)  I wasn’t born yet.  (Laughter.)
 
On Thursday, December 6, 1956.  And before Dr. King had pointed us to the mountaintop, before he told us about his dream in front of the Lincoln Memorial, King came here, as a 27-year-old preacher, to speak on what he called “The Challenge of a New Age.”  “The Challenge of a New Age.”  It was a period of triumph, but also uncertainty, for Dr. King and his followers — because just weeks earlier, the Supreme Court had ordered the desegregation of Montgomery’s buses, a hard-wrought, hard-fought victory that would put an end to the 381-day historic boycott down in Montgomery, Alabama. Continue Reading →

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Bush-Clinton TV Ad For Haiti (CC)

Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton record an appeal to America to help Haitian earthquake victims. To donate visit www.clintonbushhaitifund.org
 
Transcript:
 
President Clinton: We Americans are always at our best we hear and heed the cries of others. President Bush: When confronted with massive human suffering Americans have always stepped up and answered the call to help. Clinton: But there’s never been anything on a scale of human tragedy in our own hemisphere like what we’re now witnessing in Haiti.  
Bush: Today President Clinton and I are joining together to appeal to you with realurgency. Clinton: Give now and lives will be saved. Continue Reading →

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St Paul Police Chief Candidate Colleen Luna

By Grace Kelly
 
Now an interview cannot review the quality of internal police management, however it does display one of the skills that the step up to chief does require – speaking to the public. I feel that in this interview, the speaking of Colleen Luna sparkles! The proof is in the videos later on in this article. So my question immediately had to be, “Why had she not come out more publicly before?” Colleen said that likes her privacy, especially with family, which I totally understand. Continue Reading →

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