Design for Public Good: An UpTake video wins praise from public design group

An eight-minute video from The UpTake’s co-founder, Chuck Olsen, and his company, VidTiger, has won notice for its skillful emphasis on the connection between good design and the public good. The UpTake is not only proud, we want to be sure our audience notices Chuck’s “mini-doc” film about the building of the Nyanza Maternity Hospital in Rwanda.

Night On The Street: Kids Helping Homeless Kids

On any given night in Minnesota, about 2,500 young people will sleep on the streets…Homelessness among the young is a growing problem in Minnesota, one that has drawn the attention of more fortunate young people belonging to church congregations all over the Twin Cities.

Half Native, Half Asian: All Service to the People…An UpTake Profile: DANIEL YANG

Daniel Yang is part of a new cohort of young leaders in the Native American community in South Minneapolis, a half-Native, half-Asian grassroots activist with a passion for public service and a special compassion for refugees. The experience of being lost, exiled and afraid is one his family knows well: Yang’s father was a Hmong refugee who, along with his Ojibwe mother, instilled a commitment to social justice and community service in his son.

Dakota Spoken Here: Mni Sota’s Dakota Indian Heritage

Editor’s note: “Mni Sota Makoce: The Land of the Dakota,” was the winner in the Minnesota category of the 2013 Minnesota Book Awards, which were announced Saturday. Congratulations to authors Gwen Westerman and Bruce White. — updated Sunday, April 14 at 8:07 a.m.

One hundred and fifty years after the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, the story of the Dakota Indian people is still connected to a troubled history of broken treaties and brutal repression that followed the war. But there is another deeper and older history: That of the Dakota people and their connection to the land of “Mni Sota Makoce,” the place where the water reflects the clouds in the sky. Minnesota is a Dakota place.

“We Are Here:” Native American Artists Explore Pain of the Dakota War of 1862

According to tradition, “We Are Here” is what each of the 38 Dakota Indian warriors who were hanged on the day after Christmas in 1862 said as the nooses were placed around their necks. “We Are Here” is also the title of an exhibit on view at the historic James J. Hill House in St. Paul, Minnesota. Native American artists comment on the events and aftermath of the U.S-Dakota War in the form of contemporary painting, sculpture and traditional works.