Indian Affairs

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Armed Mercenaries Returning to Wisconsin Woods — Legally, This Time

Heavily armed and camouflaged guard from Bulletproof Securities, Inc., patrols Wisconsin woods in July. The security force was withdrawn because it lacked legal permits. The permits have now been issued by state authorities and the guns are back. Click to see video report.

Mercenary-style guards carrying assault weapons will return to the north woods of WIsconsin after an Arizona-based security firm received proper permits to operate in Wisconsin. Last month, the heavily-armed guards, wearing camouflage and some with face coverings, startled hikers and other forest visitors when they showed up — without permits or the legally required name tags and credentials.
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Ernest Wabasha: The Burden of Minnesota’s History

Wabasha, Ernest

I was 30 years old, a journalist with a passing knowledge of Indian history. Yet it had never occurred to me, until I came across the name of Ernest Wabasha one day, that people still lived among us who were connected to the terrible events of 1862-63, the time of the so-called “Sioux Uprising” and the exile and banishment of the Dakota Sioux from their homeland. But there it was: The great-great grandson of Chief Wabasha was living on a reservation near Redwood Falls! I looked up Mr. Wabasha’s telephone number and called to ask if I — a complete stranger — might visit some day. “What are you doing this afternoon,” he asked. Continue Reading →

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Non-Removables: The Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Welcomes You to St Paul (Again)

St Paul's Crowne Plaza Hotel. Click on the photo to see video of the announcement that the hotel is being bought by the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe

Today, in an ironic reversal of fortune that would have been impossible to foresee just a few years ago, Minnesota’s native people again are warmly welcoming people to their homes on the Mississippi River — homes called The Crowne Plaza and DoubleTree Hotels. Continue Reading →

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Half Native, Half Asian: All Service to the People…An UpTake Profile: DANIEL YANG

Click on the Image of Daniel Yang to Hear More About His Story

Daniel Yang is part of a new cohort of young leaders in the Native American community in South Minneapolis, a half-Native, half-Asian grassroots activist with a passion for public service and a special compassion for refugees. The experience of being lost, exiled and afraid is one his family knows well: Yang’s father was a Hmong refugee who, along with his Ojibwe mother, instilled a commitment to social justice and community service in his son. Continue Reading →

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Hundreds Oppose Bill Weakening Wisconsin Mining Regulations

the-hull-rust-open-pit

The fight against a proposed weakening of Wisconsin mining regulations that would facilitate the construction of a giant open-pit mine in Ashland County continued this week with hundreds of Wisconsin residents, including many representing Native American tribes, traveling to Madison to testify against the bill at a legislative hearing.
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Dakota Spoken Here: Mni Sota’s Dakota Indian Heritage

Up for A Minnesota Book Award Saturday: Mni Sota Makoce: The Land of the Dakota

Editor’s note: “Mni Sota Makoce: The Land of the Dakota,” was the winner in the Minnesota category of the 2013 Minnesota Book Awards, which were announced Saturday. Congratulations to authors Gwen Westerman and Bruce White. — updated Sunday, April 14 at 8:07 a.m.

One hundred and fifty years after the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862, the story of the Dakota Indian people is still connected to a troubled history of broken treaties and brutal repression that followed the war. But there is another deeper and older history: That of the Dakota people and their connection to the land of “Mni Sota Makoce,” the place where the water reflects the clouds in the sky. Minnesota is a Dakota place. Continue Reading →

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150 Years After America’s Largest Mass Execution: Minnesota and its Dakota Indians Still Search for Healing

Riders from the Dakota 38 Plus 2 Reconciliation Ride arrive in downtown Mankato on December 26, 2012, for a ceremony at Reconciliation Park to commemorate the execution of thirty-eight Dakota warriors on the day after Christmas in 1862. The ride left Lower Brule, South Dakota on December 10, and made fourteen stops along the 340 mile ride to Mankato.

A two-week journey from South Dakota ends in Mankato, Minnesota to mark the 150th anniversary of the largest execution in the United States where 38 Dakota (Sioux) Indian men were hanged for their involvement in the Dakota-US War of 1862. Continue Reading →

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“We Are Here:” Native American Artists Explore Pain of the Dakota War of 1862

Click on Jim Denomie's Painting to hear more about the exhibit

According to tradition, “We Are Here” is what each of the 38 Dakota Indian warriors who were hanged on the day after Christmas in 1862 said as the nooses were placed around their necks. “We Are Here” is also the title of an exhibit on view at the historic James J. Hill House in St. Paul, Minnesota. Native American artists comment on the events and aftermath of the U.S-Dakota War in the form of contemporary painting, sculpture and traditional works. Continue Reading →

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Tribal IDs Might Not Be Valid If MN Voter Restriction Amendment Passes

Click ID to hear about the problems Native Americans could face if the voter restriction amendment passes

Former Minneapolis School Board member and citizen of the White Earth Nation Peggy Flanagan says her tribal ID may be invalid if Minnesota voter restriction constitutional amendment passes. She’s prepared to take legal action if it passes. Continue Reading →

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Healing Minnesota’s Deepest Wound: Pardoning a Dakota Warrior

Courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

After the US-Dakota War of 1862, 38 Dakota men were hanged in the largest mass execution in US history. Many believe the execution was also one of the largest miscarriages of justice in the nation’s history. Today, Representative Dean Urdahl hopes to “rub a little salve in the wound” by seeking a pardon for one of the executed warriors. His name was Chaska. Continue Reading →

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