Video Replay: Governor Dayton Takes Oath For Second Term

On Monday Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton was sworn in for a second term along with Lt. Governor Tina Smith. Also taking the oath of office was new Secretary of State Steve Simon, State Attorney General Lori Swanson and State Auditor Rebecca Otto.

Minnesota Supreme Court Justice Alan Page served as master of ceremonies for the event at the Landmark Center in downtown St. Paul.

Above: Video of entire inauguration event
Below: Video of Gov. Dayton’s address

Click here for sharable version of this video

Remarks of Governor Mark Dayton – As prepared for delivery
Inaugural Address
Monday, January 5, 2015

Thank you, Chief Justice Gildea. It has been an honor to work with you during the past four years. Justice Page, thank you for your extraordinary service to the people of Minnesota. Justice Lillehaug, it is great to have you up here.

On a personal note, I’d like to welcome the members of my immediate family, who are with me today. My father, Bruce Dayton, who is now 96 years old, is here with his wife, Ruth. My brother, Brandt, and my sisters, Lucy and Anne, have traveled from New York City and Helena, Montana. You just saw my wonderful son, Eric, and daughter-in-law, Cory — along with my grandson, Hugo, who makes four generations of Daytons here today.

I give special thanks to my father, Bruce Dayton. Dad, you have been a guiding light throughout my life. I would not be standing here today without your love and support. Thank you.

To: Vice President Mondale; Senator Klobuchar; our Constitutional Officers; other Distinguished Guests; and my fellow Minnesotans.

Thank you for the opportunity to serve as your Governor for four more years. I especially want to thank you, who voted for me, and placed your trust in me. I will do my very best to serve you well.

I will do my very best to serve all Minnesotans well.

We gather today at a much better time, than when I took this Oath of Office four years ago. Back then, both our state and nation were struggling to recover from “The Great Recession.” Minnesota’s unemployment rate was 6.8%; nationally it was 9.1%.

Since then, our country’s economy has improved; and our state has helped lead the way. Minnesota’s unemployment rate has dropped to a remarkable 3.7%.

We have added over 191,000 jobs during the past four years – and we’re not done yet.

Recently, it was reported that our nation’s economy grew at a 5% annual rate during the third quarter, the fastest pace in over 11 years. The Dow Jones Industrial Average topped 18,000. Many economists are now optimistic that our country is entering a period of more robust growth.

Yet, recent reports also show that inequities in Americans’ wealth and income are at record highs. Perhaps that explains the large divide between the new optimism on Wall Street and the persistent pessimism on Main Street, where real wages and median family incomes have continued to fall, even during this recovery.

Two-thirds of Americans currently believe our country is “On the Wrong Track.” Only one-fourth say it’s now going “In the Right Direction.”

But what is the “Right Direction”? Many Americans would like to go back in time – to regain what they had before. The world, however, has moved into a new era – marked by Globalization – where companies and countries engage in fierce competition to create the lowest-cost production sites in the world and reap the profits from doing so.

This dispersion of economic activity has cost millions of Americans their jobs, their economic security, and their confidence in the future.

The world today offers many good opportunities. Yet, while there are many roads to successful, fulfilling lives, there is, essentially, just one path. It is through education, training, and the development of marketable skills.

Surrounded by low-cost competition, the United States retains one enormous advantage – the inventive and entrepreneurial abilities of our people. Most of our challengers, be they companies or countries, have not mastered the complexities of conceiving and designing new products and services; then organizing and financing them; then managing a group of people to produce or provide them.

In Minnesota, we have a further advantage – one that has been our greatest asset for generations. Our citizens have long-known that a good education is the key to our success. Now, we need to realize that a good education is the key to our survival.

And that an excellent education unlocks the door to unprecedented opportunities.

Our future success – the health of our families, the vitality of our communities, and the prosperity of our state – will depend upon our making those excellent educations available to all Minnesotans. We’re part-way there.

We have ample evidence that most of our students are now receiving good educations.
Many are getting great educations, from talented teachers, professors, and other educators throughout our state.

But are all of our students learning what they will need – to find good jobs and achieve success in the world that awaits them? If we’re going to improve people’s lives in our state, we have to improve their educations. We have to create a State of Educational Excellence.

How? By investing in it.

There’s a big difference between spending and investing. Spending is for now. People spend money to buy what they need or want right away.

Investing is for the future. People invest money now to produce future benefits and rewards.

Wise financial management requires understanding this difference. And striking a proper balance between them.

In the coming months, we will make important decisions about spending or investing a projected state budget surplus of one billion dollars. We could spend it to provide goods and services for more people. We could spend it to provide tax cuts for some people.

I recommend that our top priority be to invest it in a better future – first and foremost, by investing it in Excellent Education. This means elevating our citizens’ educations from good to excellent.

And making that educational excellence available to everyone.

To begin, we need to make quality educational experiences available to all our children, even before they reach school age. In one of the best initiatives of my first term, we now offer free, all-day kindergarten throughout Minnesota. We have created better opportunities for five year-olds everywhere to develop the intellectual and social skills they will need – not just to survive, but to thrive.

This new effort has also shown us the number of children, who are not ready for kindergarten. If our response is to do nothing – or too little – to remedy the disparities, we know that they will later cause worse crises for those kids – and for us.

So, we must expand and improve our early education and child-care programs. Additionally, some children’s needs go beyond early education. They must be better-protected from neglect and abuse.

We must do more to prevent the mistreatment of Minnesota’s children and to intervene quickly and effectively, when necessary. We must also develop the mental health resources to help them overcome those traumas.

I don’t have the expertise to design those initiatives. However, we have many legislators, educators, doctors, social workers, judges, and others, who do. During the next five months, let us decide what more we must do to save our children. Then, do it.

After we get healthier, better-prepared children into our schools, we need to elevate their academic experiences — from better elementary and secondary school academics, to better emotional support and career guidance, to postsecondary educations that will better lead to success.

I don’t want to spend more education dollars on what is being done now. And I won’t spend more on doing less.

I’ll oppose four-day school weeks, less time in classrooms, or shorter school years. The era of shortchanging our students’ educations is over.

Instead, I want investments for more time in studies and other developmental activities. For year-round school options. For after-school and special help services. For advanced high school and college courses in skills needed for the jobs of the future.

In the face of such intense global competition, for the sake of our children and the continued growth of our economy, we cannot do anything less.

Some critics will say: Invest more money in education? But we spend so much already! Unfortunately, No – we don’t. According to the most recent US Census report, Minnesota presently ranks 24th among the fifty states in per-pupil Elementary and Secondary School spending.

Our state’s support for Higher Education in real dollars recently fell to its lowest level in thirty years.

During the past four years, we started to reverse the previous decade’s disinvestment– with all-day kindergarten, early childhood scholarships, per-pupil aid increases, and more postsecondary assistance. But those new investments have only returned Minnesota’s education expenditures to the national average – and that’s not good enough.

Now, with $1 billion surplus, the question is not: “Can we afford to provide Minnesotans with the best educations?” It is: “Can we afford to continue providing less?”

The answer, obviously, is “No!”

For that reason, and for the sake of our state’s future, I will dedicate the next four years to regaining our state’s position as a national and global leader in education excellence.

I want all Minnesotans to have access to the best possible educations, to the skills and training they will need to achieve their highest aspirations.

In the days ahead, I will talk about other essential investments – including transportation.

I also recognize that there are other important, unmet needs in the lives of many Minnesotans.

I know that many advocates sincerely believe their needs – or their clients’ needs – should be our state’s top priority – and funded accordingly.

I look forward to working with the outstanding legislative leaders, who are here today, and with their colleagues, who will begin tomorrow, to better address those needs.

In closing, I note that much attention has been given recently to the divisions within our state. Most of them are familiar. During my forty years in and around Minnesota governance, those resentments have simmered and, occasionally, erupted.

There’s Greater Minnesota against the Metro Area. Central cities versus suburbs. Urban schools against rural districts. East Metro versus West Metro. Cities, counties, and townships compared to other cities, counties, and townships.

Someone always believes that someone else is getting a better deal.

Those rivalries are not going to disappear. However, they cannot be permitted to blind us to the larger truth that we are all ONE MINNESOTA.

What binds us together is much more important than what pulls us apart. What helps one region usually benefits our entire state. Not always, but usually.

Economic growth in one area pays for property tax relief in another. Good farm prices in southern Minnesota boost sales and revenues in metro stores. Shops in Duluth do better, when the Range is at full production.

Better transit in the west metro adds to the vitality of the east metro, and vice versa. Counties benefit, when cities within their borders are thriving – and when other cities in other counties are thriving.

What helps some Minnesotans, usually helps all of us. So let’s cheer each other’s successes, not resent them.

And, finally, let’s remember that not only are we all One, we are also Number One. When it comes to promoting Minnesota’s virtues, we’re too modest. Besides, we’re often so focused on what we think is wrong, we forget everything that is right. And – if we do remember – we’re careful not to talk about it.

But we do need to talk about it. Not as an exercise in collective self-esteem, but because we’re competing with 49 other states and many countries to attract the best and the brightest – students, scientists, nurses, doctors, mechanics, machinists, entrepreneurs, executives – the talent upon which our future success depends.

When it’s all added up and all sorted out, most of us live in Minnesota, because we want to.
We know we’re not perfect; but we’re very good – and getting even better. Let’s not forget that our state is often recognized by national and international experts as among the best or even the very best.

Casting all Minnesota modesty aside – we should be proud. Because we so often are the best. And because, when we are, we have earned it. Through smart minds, good ideas, and hard work.

Through all of us pulling together and making our state – despite lacking the advantages of ocean beaches, or Rocky Mountains, or fossil fuel riches – into a place unique and extraordinary.

A state upon which we proudly emblazon our motto: “L’Etoile du Nord,” “The Star of the North,” and bequeath it even brighter to future generations.

Remarks of Lt. Governor Tina Smith – As prepared for delivery
Inaugural Remarks
Monday, January 5, 2015

Thank you Justice Lillehaug. Governor Dayton, I am honored to serve with you, and deeply grateful for your service to Minnesota.

Chief Justice Gildea. Justice Page. Senator Klobuchar. My friend and mentor Vice President Mondale. My parents Chris and Harlan Flint. My husband Archie and dear sons Sam and Mason – and Louie Mondale. Distinguished guests, friends, Minnesotans. I am honored by your presence, and deeply honored to be sworn in as Minnesota’s 48th Lt. Governor. I will serve Minnesota to the very best of my capacity.

In 1882, Charles Alfred Pillsbury completed construction of the Pillsbury “A” Mill, the largest flour mill in the world on the banks of America’s greatest River. His drive for a better way revolutionized flour milling in America, changed wheat growing practices, and changed Minnesota and the whole world for the better.

In truth, Minnesota has been a capitol of invention, a veritable hotbed of creative thinking, ingenuity, and “how can we do this better” thinking since before written history, starting with the Dakota and Ojibwe people, who invented better ways to harvest and preserve food, and survive Minnesota winter days like this one.

It’s amazing when you think about it. People living in Minnesota invented the first autopilot used on airplanes during World War II. We engineered a new process to turn low-grade iron ore into valuable taconite pellets (and so saved a way of life and economy on the Iron Range). Minnesotans developed advances in agriculture that feed the world. We pioneered open-heart surgery and pacemakers. We invented HMOs, supercomputers, wet/dry sandpaper, post-it notes, Harelson apples, water skis, snowmobiles, snow blowers (not surprising) and winter hardy alfalfa. Not to mention Bisquick, SPAM, Tonka trucks, and Twister.

These inventions have made life better, safer, healthier, and more fun for millions of people.

We have to ask ourselves, why has a state with a relatively small population produced so much invention?

We often talk about our rich natural resources, and our well-educated people, and certainly these factors are important – even essential.

But Invention requires something more. It requires the capacity to see possibility, connection and relationships where others just see problems. Inventors see something that isn’t working that great and ask, how can we make it work better? Inventors bring urgency and purpose to their work – they are in a hurry to make progress.

This is a characteristically Minnesota way of thinking. Whether you are a 10th generation Minnesotan or your family moved north last year, at our best we are earnest, hardworking, disciplined people who every day in big and small ways are determined to make things work better, for the good of the whole.

This is the heart of invention, and the heart of what makes Minnesota exceptional. In business language, we would call this our competitive advantage.

Minnesota’s challenge for 2015 and beyond is to nourish this spirit of invention – to keep our competitive advantage.

Inventive thinking obviously applies to making things work better. But it also must apply to making our politics and communities work better – better public services, better transportation, stronger business climate, safer neighborhoods, excellent schools. To achieve this requires investment, but it also requires us to get better at challenging the conventional wisdom and measuring our progress. We need to replace words like “we tried that before” or “that can’t be done” with “How would that work?”

The heart of invention beats in every corner of our state, from the apartment buildings in Cedar Riverside to the farms and small towns across Minnesota. Let’s make sure these inventors and creative people have the tools they need to make their ideas fly.

Invention and creativity, most importantly, lives in Minnesota’s classrooms, embodied in Minnesota’s outstanding teachers, and nascent in the hearts and minds of the bright-eyed students sitting at their desks. These future inventors, these children, speak hundreds of languages, have rich life experiences, and hold exceptional promise for our state. Let us follow Governor Dayton’s lead, and create a state of Educational Excellence that is worthy of their promise.

Our history of invention is built on our faith that we can do better, we can make progress, we can improve people’s lives. It is our legacy, and our future, best expressed by our old friend Senator Paul Wellstone who said, we all do better when we all do better.

Let’s go out and invent our future, and in so doing build an even better Minnesota.

Thank you.

Live Blog Dayton Inauguration
 

Leave a Reply