Helping The Helpers

Support for healthcare workers is needed now more than ever. As the recent Pandemic is highlighting the need for ‘wrap around’ services such as food support, mental health services, and long-term child care one organization is leading the field in how to best serve this community and bring about structural changes to our system of hospitals, clinics and other leaders across the state, coming together to proactively support the mental and emotional health of our healthcare workforce during the COVID-19 crisis. As healthcare and mental health leaders share practices and learnings in real time, ICSI collects and curates them to build a shared knowledge network.

Career Counseling: The Impact of Ethnicity, Gender, and Class on Career Options, Career Choices, and Career Opportunities – An Interview with Emerging Artist Chavonn Williams Shen

The Spotlight Series explores how our ethnicity, gender, and class impact a career path. Individual interviews allow us to hear personal experiences of how these three areas are intertwined and the strategies used to navigate around them. This specific article highlights the work of emerging artist Chavonn Williams Shen.

Opinion Submission: Minneapolis Ballot Measure to Dismantle the Police Will Test the Strength of Our Movement

In November, Minneapolis voters may get to decide whether to dismantle the city’s police department, setting up a dramatic battle for public opinion in the epicenter of the national uprising. This presents a huge opportunity for the movement to substantially weaken the repressive powers of the police, and to win new investments addressing the deep structural inequalities in our communities. But if the movement simply echoes the vague radical rhetoric of our city council, rather than uniting around clear policy demands, right-wing and establishment forces could win the popular vote. Despite invoking Angela Davis, city council is not proposing major defunding much less abolishing the police. Like Angela Davis, our movement should link calls to defund the police with broader demands aimed at ending the deep structural inequalities embedded into capitalism. At the same time, to win the popular vote for the referendum in November, we need to distinguish between immediate campaigning demands and building support over time for our broader vision of fundamental social change and a police-free-future.

Column: Why I am an abolitionist

Marjaan’s personal experiences has led him to the conclusion that the police are not reformable. However, he says, “if we’re not challenging the economic arrangement that requires police in the first place, they become an easy scapegoat. If we’re serious about abolishing the police we must also be serious about abolishing racial capitalism.”

Senate Committee Hearing Investigates Law Enforcement Response to Columbus Statue Destruction

By: Sheila Regan

The joint committees on transportation and public safety continued hearings on the topic of the unrest following the death of George Floyd on Wednesday, with a focus on the toppling of the Christopher Columbus statue. 

Led by  Senator Scott Newman (R, Hutchinson), chair of the transportation committee, the hearing began, as had the previous hearing about the unrest the joint committee held a week ago, with an extensive video of news clips about the Columbus statue going down, and the response by Governor Tim Walz as well as Lt. Governor Peggy Flanagan, who had wrote on Facebook, “I can’t say I’m sad the statue of Christopher Columbus is gone. I’m not.” 

The hearing included two testifiers, Colonel Matthew Langer, chief of the Minnesota State Patrol, and John Harrington, commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Public Safety. 

During the morning session with Langer, Republican senators questioned Langer about the incident on June 10, when protesters toppled the Christopher Columbus statue in front of the Minnesota State Capitol. The protest had been announced at around noon that day on Facebook through an event page co-hosted by the AIM of Twin Cities & AIM Patrol of Minneapolis, and the Native Lives Matter Facebook pages. Langer said the Facebook post stated it would begin in Minneapolis, but the protesters arrived at the capitol much earlier than anticipated, at about 5 p.m. 

According to Langer, his team had a “plan a” and a “plan b” for responding to he protest. “Plan a was to engage with whoever did arrive and discuss expectations and discuss our role and hope that would work,” he said.

Supporting LGBT+ Youth

LGBT+ youth are at increased risk for bullying compared to peers, as well as child abuse or foster care placement due to parent rejection. This is what to do if your child comes out to you.

Narratives from Day One of The Protests Following George Floyd’s Murder

By: Rico Morales, Freelance Reporter

UpTake reporter Rico Morales interviewed people on the street the day after George Floyd, a black man from Minneapolis, was killed by a Minneapolis police officer. Rico Morales works at the Cup Foods. A Cup Foods employee had called the cops on Floyd. The grocery store is a long-standing, immigrant-owned business. https://soundcloud.com/user-195922739/narratives-from-day-one-of-the-protests-following-george-floyds-murder